Notifying the Fire and Rescue service about breaches in fire safety

A letter you can copy

What to do:

  • Copy and paste the text below into an email or document.
  • Replace any text [in brackets] with your own information.
  • Include details {in curly brackets} if they are relevant, or remove them if they are not.
  • Send the email to your local Fire Service, or print out the document and send it by post.
  • You can find contact details for your local Fire Service here.
  • If you are sending by post, keep a copy for yourself and a record of the date that the message was sent.

[Your address]
[Today’s date]

[Name of your local Fire Service]
[Fire Service’s address]

Dear [name of Fire Service],

I am a tenant of [name of your block or building] and I am writing to inform you that I believe I have identified {a breach/breaches} in fire safety in my building.

I have notified my landlord about the matter, but have not had a satisfactory response, so I am writing in the hope that you can assist.

{I believe that a Fire Risk Assessment has not been conducted for a period of more than twelve months.}
{The common ways of the building which act as a fire escape route are blocked.}
{There is no marked fire escape route.}
{The landlord is unable to inform me who is the Responsible Person for my block.}
{Flammable materials are being stored in my block.}
{I believe the gas system to be unsafe.}
{I believe the block to be a fire risk because of the way it was constructed.}
{The cladding is made of [ACM/HPL], a flammable material.}
{I believe that compartmentation has been breached.}
{Something else}

Would you be able to meet me in the block at some time, so that I can show you the situation?

Many thanks for any help you can give me in this matter.

Yours sincerely,
[sign your name]
[print your name]


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Reference

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