Notifying your landlord about breaches in fire safety

A letter you can copy

What to do:

  • Copy and paste the text below into an email or document.
  • Replace any text [in brackets] with your own information
  • Include details {in curly brackets} if they are relevant, or remove them if they are not.
  • Send the email to your landlord, or print out the document and send it by post.
  • If you are sending by post, keep a copy for yourself and a record of the date that the message was sent.

For most letters, we recommend asking for a response within two weeks, but in the case of fire safety, time is of the essence and we have suggested a period of seven days at the most.


[Your address]
[Today’s date]

[Name of your contact or landlord]
[Your landlord’s address]

[Your rent/tenant ID number]
{REF: any reference number you were given when previously raising this subject}

Dear [your landlord’s name],

I am a tenant of [name of your block or building] and I am {again} writing to inform you about a breach in fire safety which I have identified.

[Details of the problem – you might use one or more of these examples:]

{I am concerned that there is no safe route in case of a fire}
{The fire escape route is blocked with [add the item/s here]}
{There are no fire escape route signs}
{The fire escape route signs are not obvious enough}
{Flammable substances are being stored in my block}
{There aren’t any fire extinguishers}
{The fire extinguishers have been broken/removed}
{Something else}

I would be grateful if you could pay a visit to the block and review the situation for yourself. I would be happy to meet you to point out the issue if it would be helpful.

Many thanks for attending to this matter. I look forward to receiving your reply as a matter of urgency, but by [date, a week in the future] at the latest.

Yours sincerely,
[sign your name]
[print your name]


If you don’t get an answer within seven days

Related guides

Guide

The corridors of my tower block are always blocked with things like buggies and furniture – are they a fire risk?

It’s important that corridors are kept clear because in case of emergency, everyone needs to be able to make a quick exit.
A woman holding a clipboard and looking at fire safety signs. Image by Professor Paul Wenham-Clarke A woman holding a clipboard and looking at fire safety signs. Image by Professor Paul Wenham-Clarke

Reference

What is a fire risk assessment?

Every tower block should have regular Fire Risk Assessments – they’re a legal requirement. But what does it mean for you, the tenant?
A man checking the safety of a window in a tower block. Image by Professor Paul Wenham-Clarke A man checking the safety of a window in a tower block. Image by Professor Paul Wenham-Clarke

Reference

What is a Responsible Person?

Have you seen a mention of a ‘responsible person’? What does it mean? It’s not just a description of a character; it’s actually a role defined by fire safety law.
A woman throwing paper planes A woman throwing paper planes

Tools you can use

Contacting your landlord

Tips and letter templates to help you communicate with your landlord when there’s something wrong, or you want to find out more.

Letter

Asking about fire risk assessments

Ask your landlord when the last Fire Risk Assessment was held and how you can see it for yourself.

Letter

Asking who the Responsible Person is

Every block requires a Responsible Person to be in charge of fire safety. Ask your landlord who it is for your building.